Exhibition — 23 Mar 2019 until 12 Jan 2020

Hybrid Sculpture presents a selection from the Stedelijk collection, ranging from the nineties to the present, a period in which artists freely interpret the discipline of sculpture, always challenging and expanding the boundaries of the medium. The term 'hybrid' refers to the mixing of genres, styles and media, which is so typical of contemporary sculpture.

  • Marc Bijl, Suicide Machine, 2003, mixed media, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Acquired with the generous support of the Mondriaan Fund, 2004.
    Marc Bijl, ‘Suicide Machine’, 2003, mixed media, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Acquired with the generous support of the Mondriaan Fund, 2004.
  • Thomas Hirschhorn, Neighbours, 2002, mixed media, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
    Thomas Hirschhorn, ‘Neighbours’, 2002, mixed media, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
  • Magali Reus, Arbroath Smokie, 2016, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Gift of the artist, 2017. Photo: Lewis Ronald.
    Magali Reus, ‘Arbroath Smokie’, 2016, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Gift of the artist, 2017. Photo: Lewis Ronald.
  • Jeff Koons, Mound of Flowers No. 1, 1991, glass, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
    Jeff Koons, ‘Mound of Flowers No. 1’, 1991, glass, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
  • Jessica Stockholder, ‘Coupling‘, 1998, metal, textile, plastic, paint, electric heater, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
    Jessica Stockholder, ‘Coupling’, 1998, metal, textile, plastic, paint, electric heater, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

The presentation includes approximately 24 works by 19 artists. Many of these are artworks are purchases made in the nineties to the present, in conjunction with several recent donations. Some works have not been shown in the museum before.

All of the artists work on the interface between sculpture and painting, performance, video art and design. Their aim is not to create a ‘pure’ three-dimensional artwork—where the focus is solely on the intrinsic properties of the piece, such as volume and space—but to mix sculpture with other media.

In doing so, the artists appropriate objects from pop culture and everyday life, and transform them by changing their size, colour or material. And, just as ‘low’ culture is a source of inspiration, ‘high culture’—art history—also offers artists a fertile frame of reference. In their work, they reflect on the way in which the institute ‘museum’ provides art with a framework and meaning. Some artists use high-tech production methods, while others focus on ‘old-fashioned’ craftsmanship and—often working with others—experiment with craft techniques such as stained glass and weaving.

This exhibition is part of STEDELIJK TURNS, a research-driven programme that focuses on the museum collection and offers fresh insights and interpretations.