Exhibition — Ongoing

Tomorrow is a Different Day spotlights art and design from the collection, from 1980 to the present, by international artists and designers who are helping to shape the changes of today and tomorrow. They challenge the status quo and offer alternative perspectives.
The presentation of art and design from before 1980 is on view at the collection presentation STEDELIJK BASE.

*During the Bruce Nauman exhibition (running until 24 October 2021), there’s an additional one-off surcharge of €3.

  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
  • Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij
    Installation view Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 - Now. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij

The decades since the 1980s have been marked by dramatic global transformations—globalisation, migration, decolonisation, digitisation, the expansion of the primary and secondary markets, and the acknowledgement of various diasporas in art and society. These global and social shifts have not gone unnoticed by artists and designers, as the work in Tomorrow is a Different Day reveals. Ever-more responsive to the world we live in, artists use their work as a force for change. By voicing resistance, by challenging conventions, and by sharing narratives of hope and longing, they tell meaningful stories that resonate in our lives today.

Jeff Koons, Ushering in Banality, 1988. © Jeff Koons, 2007. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Jeff Koons, Ushering in Banality, 1988. © Jeff Koons, 2007. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Barricade, 2014, oil, ink on canvas. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Barricade, 2014, oil, ink on canvas. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Some artists in the new collection presentation had, for a long time, been less visible in the museum. For Tomorrow is a Different Day, the curators sought out untold narratives, to be displayed alongside more famous names. The Stedelijk also made a point of purchasing several new works by artists including Martine Syms, El Anatsui, Marcel Pinas and Anna Tereshkina, to deepen the collection. On the basis of themes such as urban activism, ecology, digitisation and migration, this refreshed collection presentation presents a multiplicity of histories, showcasing works by familiar and lesser-known names such as Steve McQueen, Rineke Dijkstra, Wolfgang Tillmans, Marlene Dumas, Sheila Hicks, Simnikiwe Buhlungu, Harvey Bouterse, Remy Jungerman and Danielle Dean.

Marlene Dumas, Big Artists, 1991, oil on linen. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
Marlene Dumas, Big Artists, 1991, oil on linen. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

In contrast to the previous installation, this new concept is built on theme rather than chronology, and confronts us with a changing world. On the one hand, it wants to seduce the visitor, but also to make them think. Aesthetic questions often contain ethical questions as well. With her installation In Pursuit of Bling, for example, Otobong Nkanga draws attention to the exploitation of the earth, and in particular the way in which raw materials are mined in one place, to be traded and used in another. Her work makes you look differently at everyday objects such as make-up and smartphones, which hide a world of inequality and exploitation. Esiri Erheriene-Essi’s paintings depicting ordinary life also disrupt your readings of the world, offering a counter-narrative to the ever-dominant media images. El Anatsui’s monumental wall sculpture made from bottle caps, has enormous presence and grandeur. By repurposing waste materials, he tells stories about trade, slavery, consumerism and the environment.

El Anatsui, I'n the World But Don’t Know the World', 2009, aluminium en koperdraad, 560 x 1000 cm, collectie Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam en Kunstmuseum Bern.

El Anatsui, In the World But Don’t Know the World, 2009, aluminum and copper wire, 560 x 1,000 cm, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Kunstmuseum Bern. Acquired with support of the Rembrandt Association (thanks in part to its Titus Fonds, its Themafonds Naoorlogse en Hedendaagse kunst, its Van Rijn Fonds and its Coleminks Fonds), the Mondriaan Fund, the BankGiro Loterij and Stiftung GegenwART, with special thanks to the SIGG COLLECTION @ El Anatsui. Photo Peter Tijhuis.

Don Yaw Kwaning, Medulla, 2018. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
Don Yaw Kwaning, Medulla, 2018. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

The new collection presentation includes both visual art and design. Designers offer solutions to the world’s evolving challenges and developments, particularly the looming climate crisis that is changing our environment at a breakneck pace. Belén gives you a chance to see our living environment in a different way by investigating the power of natural resources. The Another Throw blankets are woven with yarns dyed with vegetable pigments that, through their specific properties, create unique colours and hues. In his project Medulla, Don Yaw Kwaning explores new uses for pitrus, or soft rush, a grass-like plant that is considered a weed in the Netherlands. By separating the soft pith (medulla) from the fibres, he develops light, organic materials that can be used in the production of furniture and packaging material. Daan Roosegaarde also turns a worthless product into something valuable with his project Smog Free Ring. The ring is made from polluted air collected by the Smog Free Tower; 1000 cubic meters of smog particles are compressed into a diamond ring.

The design collection also addresses the theme of displacement and memories with newly purchased works by Foundland, Czar Kristoff and Bodil Ouedrago, among others. These works are set up in a specially designed space that gives a different context and perspective to the works.

The new collection presentation features works by artists and designers who are courageous, bold and hopeful. With interventions that are at times disturbing, and with heart-warming stories and inspiring perspectives, they invite us to see the changing world in a new way. Tomorrow is a Different Day teaches us to take a closer look at our society and is a chance for the Stedelijk to critically examine its own social position. Tomorrow everything will be different from today, and yesterday is different seen from the perspective of today. The Stedelijk’s collection of art and design always keeps us alert to the issues posed by constant change.

— Rein Wolfs, director Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Tomorrow is a Different Day - 1980 – Now features work by:

Etel Adnan, Francis Alÿs, Belén, Rachid Ben Ali, Ben Laloua/Didier Pascal, Jop van Bennekom, Cosima von Bonin, Simnikiwe Buhlungu, Danielle Dean, Rineke Dijkstra, Marlene Dumas, Shannon Ebner, El Anatsui, Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Foundland, Karl Fritsch, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Gillion Grantsaan, Hans Gremmen, Joseph Grigely, Xu Han, Harvey Bouterse, Marit van Heumen, Sheila Hicks, Richard Hutten, Steffani Jemison, Remy Jungerhansman, Patricia Kaersenhout, Iris Kensmil, Jeff Koons, Czar Kristoff, Otto Künzli, Don Yaw Kwaning, Charl Landvreugd, Louise Lawler, Olia Lialina, Harmen Liemburg, Angela Luna, Max Kisman, Steve McQueen, Christien Meindertsma, Metahaven, Issey Miyake, Manfred Nisslmüller, Otobong Nkanga, Bodil Ouedraogo, Noon Passama, Marcel Pinas, Sigmar Polke, Michel Quarez, Karim Rashid, Raw Color, Willem de Rooij, Daan Roosegaarde, Lotty Rosenfeld, Swip Stolk , Martine Syms, Ikko Tanaka, Michael Tedja, Anna Tereshkina, Wolfgang Tillmans, Frank Tjepkema, Danh Vo, Witho Worms, Billie Zangewa.

Anna Tereshkina, Untitled (from the police station series), 2020 (front). Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Anna Tereshkina, Untitled (from the police station series), 2020 (front). Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Remy Jungerman, INITIANDS, 2015. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy Galerie Ron Mandos, Amsterdam. © Remy Jungerman. Photo Peter Tijhuis.
Remy Jungerman, INITIANDS, 2015. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy Galerie Ron Mandos, Amsterdam. © Remy Jungerman. Photo Peter Tijhuis.

LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF…

In the audio tour accompanying the new collection presentation, artists, designers or curators who share their personal stories of the works on view in each room. The artists and designers tell you why they created the piece, what it means to them and what they are looking for in their work. The curators talk about what makes a work stand out, and how each piece fits into this new presentation concept. Several artists also wrote texts that will be presented in the exhibition alongside the works.

A FRESH PERSPECTIVE

History is continually in flux, constantly fed by new voices and insights. Tomorrow is a Different Day is the first part of the Stedelijk’s new collection presentation, with more room for familiar, new and different perspectives. The presentations of art from the periods 1945-1980, and art and design up to 1945 will be redesigned, in turn, in 2022.

Harvey Bouterse, #33, 2018-2020, ceramics. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Harvey Bouterse, #33, 2018-2020, ceramics. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam