Exhibition — Ongoing

The Stedelijk unveils the final section of the new collection presentation, Yesterday Today, about art and design from around 1880 to 1950. With over 300 works, the exhibition shows how a single art history does not exist, but rather it encompasses many perspectives. Well-known artistic movements are discussed, such as the Amsterdam School, Functionalism, De Stijl, Bauhaus, CoBrA and the avant-garde around Kazimir Malevich and Olga Rozanova. By showing well-known works together with lesser-known highlights, other stories can rise to the surface.

Like the previous two parts, Yesterday Today shows that art and design are closely linked to social developments. This presentation pays extra attention to female makers and mediators.

The collection from 1950 until 1980 is on view in Everyday, Someday and Other Stories. The collection from 1980 until now is Tomorrow is a Different Day.

Social developments

Yesterday Today shows how art and design are closely linked to social developments. The rise of industrialization, the modern city and nightlife are subjects in works by such artists as Marc Chagall, Jan Ouwersloot, Jan Sluijters, Charley Toorop and Betsy Westendorp-Osieck. Meanwhile, providing stark contrast, poverty and ideologies leading to war and resistance can be seen in the works of artists such as Max Ernst, George Grosz, Willem Sandberg and Emmy Andriesse – as well as in infographics, some of which represent the first attempts at influencing the masses.

The relationship between modernism and colonialism is examined, such as Jan Toorop's relationship to his native country, present-day Indonesia, the image of Indonesia in art and design and the appropriation of the batik technique by European designers. In addition, attention is paid to the anti-colonial struggle, which started much earlier than the 1940s, as witnessed by posters showing the connection between industrialization and colonization and the photo Piet Zwart made in 1933 of the Surinamese anti-colonial writer Anton de Kom.

Dolly Rudeman, Maria Paudler in Women on Strike, 1929, offset. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
Dolly Rudeman, Maria Paudler in Women on Strike, 1929, offset. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
  • Gerrit Rietveld, Witteveen kinderstoel, design 1918, production 1921-1922
    Gerrit Rietveld, Witteveen kinderstoel, design 1918, production 1921-1922
  • Olga Vladimirovna Rozanova, Abstract composition, 1915, collage: paper on paper. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, on loan from the Stichting Khardzhiev, 2001. Kazimir Malevich, Supremus nr.50, 1915, oil on canvas. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, acquired in 1958.
    Olga Vladimirovna Rozanova, Abstract composition, 1915, collage: paper on paper. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, on loan from the Stichting Khardzhiev, 2001. Kazimir Malevich, Supremus nr.50, 1915, oil on canvas. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, acquired in 1958.
  • Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret en, Charlotte Perriand, chaise longue (model LC4), design 1928, production 1965,
    Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret en, Charlotte Perriand, chaise longue (model LC4), design 1928, production 1965,
  • Karel Appel, Seated girl, 1946, oil on cardboard. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
    Karel Appel, Seated girl, 1946, oil on cardboard. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
  • Henri Cartier-Bresson, Celebration in Solo's Streets After Transfer Ceremonies, November 13th, 1949, gelatin silver print. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Mikhail Matyushin, Self Portrait, 1917, oil on canvas on wood. On loan from the Stichting Khardzhiev.
    Henri Cartier-Bresson, Celebration in Solo's Streets After Transfer Ceremonies, November 13th, 1949, gelatin silver print. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Mikhail Matyushin, Self Portrait, 1917, oil on canvas on wood. On loan from the Stichting Khardzhiev.

Women in art 

Throughout the exhibition, special focus is given to female collectors, curators, critics and others. For instance, with her bequest, Sophia Adriana Lopez Suasso-de Bruijn laid the foundation for the Stedelijk Museum. The presentation also represents the first visible result of the research project The Other Half: Women’s Contribution to the Dutch Art World, 1780-1980, a collaboration between the Stedelijk Museum, RKD, Rijksmuseum, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen and the University of Amsterdam. Also, many works by female makers are on display, around a third of the shown artists, designers and photographers is female. These works include highlights from the ‘Joffers’ – artists from the interwar period that included Charley Toorop, Else Berg, Nola Hatterman and Anneke van der Feer. Also featured are women designers of the Amsterdam School and international functionalism, including designers Margaret Kropholler and Charlotte Perriand, who were among the first women in their field. Women from the Bauhaus are also discussed, but then with the critical comment that they were mainly ‘relegated’ to the weaving workshop.

Anneke van der Feer, Self Portrait, 1938.  Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
Anneke van der Feer, Self Portrait, 1938. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.
Pablo Picasso, Femme nue devant le jardin, 1956, alkyd on canvas.
Karel Appel, Seated girl, 1946, oil on cardboard. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Pablo Picasso, Femme nue devant le jardin, 1956, alkyd on canvas.

Past themes that still resonate

As the title suggests, Yesterday Today offers a contemporary look at the collection. Moreover, many themes from the past turn out to be surprisingly topical and in line with contemporary debates – including the contribution of female makers; the dark sides of capitalism, such as poverty, inequality, class society and colonialism; and the Eurocentric view, which only tells part of the story. Issues such as engagement, ideologies, dictatorship, war and resistance, migration and diaspora are equally related to our time.

When I took this job, I said it was important for me to work with the entire curatorial team in broadening the collection. The result is this new collection presentation. We started with the realization that art history is ultimately a collection of different histories and stories. And even with the full new presentation now being open, the collection presentation will continue to change – like history, it will stay in motion.

— Rein Wolfs, director Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Jackson Pollock, Reflection of the Big Dipper, 1947, paint on canvas. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1950. Eva Besnyö, Self Portrait, Berlijn, 1931, gelatin silver print. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Jackson Pollock, Reflection of the Big Dipper, 1947, paint on canvas. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1950. Eva Besnyö, Self Portrait, Berlijn, 1931, gelatin silver print. Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Yesterday Today features works of: Aino Aalto, Ragnhild d'Ailly, August Allebé, Peter Alma, Peter Alma, Emmy Andriesse, Lizzy Ansingh, Karel Appel, Gerd Arntz, Maria Austria, Jan Baanders Sr.,Tine Baanders, Baharudin, Guido Balsamo Stella, Marius Bauer, Max Beckmann, Chris Beekman, Else Berg, Ella Bergmann-Michel, Eva Besnyö, Jeanne Bieruma Oosting, Roger André Bissière, Lucienne Bloch, Sara Blokland, Erwin Blumenfeld, Anna Boch, Louis Bogtman, Eugène Brands, Marianne Brandt, Georges Braque, Charles Breijer, George Hendrik Breitner, Marcel Breurer, Anne Brigman, Hans Brockhage, Nico Broekman, Alexander Calder, Heinrich Campendonk, Agnes Canta, Fred Carasso, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paul Cézanne, Marc Chagall, Paul Citroen, Fré Cohen, Theo Colenbrander, Constant, A.D.Copier, Corneille, Gustave De Smet, Robert Delaunay, Agus Djaya, Otto Djaya, Theo van Doesburg, Cesar Domela, Kees van Dongen, Harm van den Dorpel, Wilhelmina Cornelia Drupsteen, Charles Dufresne, Charles & Ray Eames, James Ensor, Max Ernst, Ida Falkenberg-Liefrinck, Anneke van der Feer, Suze Fokker, Gisèle Freund, Lotti van der Gaag, Leo Gestel, Alberto Giacometti, Leon Gischia, Willem Hendrik Gispen, Vincent van Gogh, Natalia Goncharova, Julio González, George Grosz, Elena Guro, Jindrich Halabala, Lea Halpern, Nola Hatterman, Erich Heckel, Jacoba van Heemskerck, Hannah Höch, Frieda Hunziker, Vilmos Huszár, Raoul Hynckes, Isaac Israëls, Egill Jacobsen, Alexej von Jawlensky, Pierre Jeanneret, Johan Barthold Jongkind, Gertrude Käsebier, Pat Keely, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Michel de Klerk, Josina Knap, Oskar Kokoschka, Käthe Kollwitz, Boris Kowadlo, Hildo Krop, Margaret Kropholler, Harry van Kruiningen, Valentina Kulagina, Rie Kuyken, Le Corbusier, Chris Lebeau, Bart van der Leck, Carel Lion Cachet, Kazimir Malevich, Henri Matisse, Mikhail Matyushin, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, Harmen Meurs, Kitty van der Mijll Dekker, Wally Moes, Lucia Moholy, László Moholy-Nagy, Piet Mondriaan, Marlow Moss, Marie-Louise von Motesiczky, Wim Oepts, Helly Oestreicher, Lisbeth Oestreicher, Cas Oorthuys, Piet Ouborg, Jan Ouwersloot, Jules Pascin, Charlotte Perriand, Trude Petri, Pablo Picasso, Willem van de Poll, Jackson Pollock, John Rädecker, Germaine Richier, Gerrit Rietveld, Coba Ritsema, Diego Rivera, Hajo Rose, Olga Rozanova, Dolly Rudeman, Erich Salomon, Willem Sandberg, Carlo Scarpa, Oskar Schlemmer, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Bernardine Schregel, Wim Schuhmacher, Paul Schuitema, Michiel Schuurman, Thérèse Schwartze, Farida Sedoc, Gino Severini, Gino Severini, Susi Singer, Annie Sipkema, Jan Sluijters, Suprapto Sukonto, Jan Frederik Staal, Mart Stam, Krijn Taconis, Charley Toorop, Jan Toorop, René Tosari, Frits Van den Berghe, Dziga Vertov, Sesostris Vitullo, Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart, Nicolaas Warb, Betsy Westendorp-Osieck,Jan Wiegers, Matthieu Wiegman, Franz Wildenhain, Marguerite Wildenhain-Friedlaender, Ad Windig, Ossip Zadkine, Piet Zwart

The Stedelijk Museum is supported by:

  • gemeente amsterdam logo
  • vriendenloterij logo
    Partner