Events — 13 Dec 2019

On the occasion of the exhibition Chagall, Picasso, Mondrian and Others: Migrant Artists in Paris the Stedelijk Museum presents a screening of the film La Haine.

Price
Museum ticket + €3,-
Location
Teijin Auditorium
Time
13 Dec, 7 pm until 9.30 pm
Main language
English
Admission
Tickets

The impact of La Haine (1995) was and is still large: for the first time outsiders could see and feel what it was really like to live in a marginal area. The film is set in the banlieues of Paris and shows the viewer 24 hours in the lives of Vinz, Said, and Hubert, three friends with different cultural backgrounds. Abdel, a fourth friend, was injured in a riot involving police. Said and Hubert try to stop Vinz from taking revenge on the police, in case Abdel doesn’t survive.

Director Mathieu Kassovitz created La Haine after yet another youngster had died after a confrontation with police in the suburbs of Paris. With the film, he depicted these youth in a different way than the media did, as sympathetic friends instead of “scum,” and he demonstrated that police violence could indeed be seen as discriminatory.

The film is now more than twenty years old but continues to be relevant and its impact is still visible. For many people La Haine feels like a manifesto and the film inspired other young film makers. One recent Dutch example is the film De Libi (2019) by director Shady El-Hamus.

PROGRAM

6:45 pm
Doors open
7 pm
Welcome and Introduction 
7:10 pm
Screening of La Haine
8:50
Conversation led by Massih Hutak
9:30 pm
End of program

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

More info online soon

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

At the beginning of the last century, Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, and other artists both acclaimed and unknown moved – for various reasons – to Paris, the art capital of the world. There, they learned to survive in a society that was becoming increasingly polarized, nationalistic, xenophobic, and anti-Semitic. This exhibition tells the story of these artists in a foreign country who, despite adverse conditions, had the courage to take art to new heights. The show is an incredible chance to see the work of the great modern masters in a new light, and to discover new artists.

At the beginning of the last century, Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian and other acclaimed and unknown artists move – for various reasons – to Paris, the art capital of the world. They must learn to survive in a society that is increasingly polarized, nationalistic, xenophobic and anti-Semitic. This exhibition tells the story of artists in a foreign country who, despite adverse conditions, have the courage to take art to new heights. The show is an incredible chance to see the work of the great modern masters in a new light, ánd to discover new artists.