News — 11 Jul 2021

KIRCHNER AND NOLDE: EXPRESSIONISM. COLONIALISM

4 September to 5 December 2021

With the exhibition ‘Kirchner and Nolde: Expressionism. Colonialism’, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam sheds light on a hitherto unexplored aspect of the work of these two prominent artists: the close connection between the work they created between 1908 and 1918 and the colonial reality in which it originated. This major exhibition actively attempts to illuminate the interplay between Expressionism and colonialism and offer a new perspective. The exhibition explores the artists’ art historical backgrounds, and, wherever possible, also tells the stories of the people and objects portrayed. Shown alongside paintings, drawings and sculptures by Kirchner and Nolde, are works by artists from other parts of the world and documentary material from that era.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, 'Nacktes Mädchen hinter Vorhang (Fränzi)', 1910-1926, Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, 'Nacktes Mädchen hinter Vorhang (Fränzi)', 1910-1926, Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

THE BEST DUTCH BOOK DESIGNS

25 September to 31 October 2021

Every year the Stedelijk and the Stichting De Best Verzorgde Boeken present the most outstanding book designs of the past year. A professional jury assesses the books on the basis of design excellence, printing and binding techniques, and the collaboration between designer and client. The Best Dutch Book Designs is the oldest annual contest of its kind in Europe. The exhibition has a long tradition at the Stedelijk. The inaugural edition was staged in 1932 and, with a few exceptions, the museum has mounted the exhibition annually.

Foto © Gerlinde de Geus
Foto © Gerlinde de Geus

OLIVER LARIC – BETWEENNESS

2 October to 9 January 2022

Multimedia artist Oliver Laric (Innsbruck, 1981, lives and works in Berlin) explores themes such as hybridity, authorship and authenticity from a post-internet perspective. Laric shows how visual expressions have been (re)used over time and remain available to us – to be recycled, over and over, in inventive and contemporary ways. For Betweenness (2018), he used found material, which he redrew frame by frame, in ever-changing configurations of lines, the basis of animation. A set of lines transforms, continuously morphing into images of organic phenomena – animals, plants, fungi and humanoid figures. This is Laric’s first solo museum exhibition in the Netherlands. The work Betweenness was recently gifted to the Stedelijk Museum.

Oliver Laric, Betweenness, 2018, HD video, colour, sound, 4 min 48 sec. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Leighton, Berlin
Oliver Laric, Betweenness, 2018, HD video, colour, sound, 4 min 48 sec. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Leighton, Berlin

NOW YOU SEE ME MORIA
POST/NO/BILLS #2

from 2 October 2021


Personal experiences, anger and pain are the basis of a special project in which refugees share photos and stories via Instagram documenting their everyday reality in Moria, Europe’s largest refugee camp, located in Greece. As part of the project, an open call was issued to European graphic designers, inviting them to create posters based on the photographs. To present these images to a broad audience, the Stedelijk will display work created by the international collective Now You See Me Moria in the second edition of POST/NO/BILLS, an exhibition series dedicated to showcasing the newest offerings in graphic design, responding to trends and social developments.


Poster design: Lea Rosner
Poster design: Lea Rosner

PRIX DE ROME 2021

13 November 2021 to 20 March 2022

This presentation features the four nominated artists for the Prix de Rome 2021: Mercedes Azpilicueta, Alexis Blake, Silvia Martes and Coralie Vogelaar. Their work examines current themes, offers critical reinterpretations of historical events, connects underexposed histories to the present, or focuses on the distant future. The four artists were provided with a grant to cover the production of the new works produced specifically for this exhibition.

LET TEXTILES TALK

Six tapestries unravelled

13 November 2021 to 20 March 2022

Six tapestries in the Stedelijk’s collection are central to this research exhibition on textile art, creative expression and institutional critique. In 1951, the Egyptian architect and pedagogue Ramses Wissa Wassef and his wife Sophie Habib Georgi began an experiment about creativity that drew praise from prominent figures in the art world, such as Willem Sandberg, Etel Adnan and Jean Paul Sartre. With the experiment, Wassef wanted to prove that creativity is innate, and anyone can make art. He did this by teaching children how to weave tapestries. In this presentation, the Stedelijk shows these tapestries in combination with works by Sheila Hicks, Etel Adnan, Dorothy Akpene Amenuke, Karel Appel, Jean Lurçat and others. Together, these tapestries map a transnational journey through history, and ask us to consider how the carpets and their creators were contextualized at the time, and the perspectives from which we can understand this experiment today.

Ali Selim, Le Potier (detail), 1961, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Ali Selim, Le Potier (detail), 1961, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

REMY JUNGERMAN – BEHIND THE FOREST

20 November 2021 to 13 March 2022

A survey of work by Remy Jungerman (Moengo, Suriname, 1959).
Remy Jungerman: Behind the Forest brings together the rich body of work produced by the artist over the past fifteen years, alongside new work created especially for this exhibition. In his sculptures, paintings, installations, collages and screen prints, Jungerman explores the intersection of pattern and symbol in Surinamese Maroon culture, the broader African Diaspora, and 20th century Modernism.

Remy Jungerman, INITIANDS, 2015. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy Galerie Ron Mandos, Amsterdam. © Remy Jungerman. Photo Peter Tijhuis
Remy Jungerman, INITIANDS, 2015. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy Galerie Ron Mandos, Amsterdam. © Remy Jungerman. Photo Peter Tijhuis

HITO STEYERL – I WILL SURVIVE

28 January to 12 June 2022

A major solo by Hito Steyerl (1966, Munich; lives and works in Berlin), a writer, cultural critic, artist, filmmaker and professor, and one of the most important and influential figures in contemporary art. Steyerl’s video installations question the interrelationships between art, society, advanced technology and neoliberal capitalism. These often essayistic and documentary works encourage the average viewer to critically reflect on previously underexposed social issues, such as colonial violence, government control, systemic racism and the power of protest.

Hito Steyerl, How Not to Be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File, 2013. Courtesy the artist, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York and Esther Schipper, Berlin
Hito Steyerl, How Not to Be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File, 2013. Courtesy the artist, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York and Esther Schipper, Berlin

NEW COLLECTION PRESENTATION: 1945-1980

from 19 February 2022

The Stedelijk is renewing its collection presentation to focus more closely on theme. The redesign will take place in three phases. Following the renewed display of contemporary work, Tomorrow is a Different Day, Collection 1980-Now, the reconfigured exhibit Art and Design 1945-1980 launches in early 2022. The third and final phase of the redesign, Art and Design before 1945, debuts in 2022

 Lynda Benglis, Female Sensibility, video, 1973, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam © 2021 Lynda Benglis, c/o Pictoright Amsterdam
Lynda Benglis, Female Sensibility, video, 1973, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam © 2021 Lynda Benglis, c/o Pictoright Amsterdam

ALREADY OPEN

TOMORROW IS A DIFFERENT DAY – COLLECTION 1980-NOW

from 10 July 2021

The Stedelijk is redesigning its collection display to reflect a new, more thematic focus. The presentation of the entire holdings will be renewed in three phases, beginning with the most contemporary works. Tomorrow is a Different Day spotlights works by international artists and designers who are helping to shape the changes of today and tomorrow. They challenge the status quo and offer alternative perspectives. Since the 1980s, the world has been in the grip of dramatic transformations—globalisation, migration, decolonisation, digitisation, the expansion of the primary and secondary markets, and the acknowledgement of various diasporas in art and society. Tomorrow is a Different Day reveals that artists are ever-more responsive to the world we live in, and use their work as a force for change. By voicing resistance, and by sharing narratives of hope and longing, they tell meaningful stories that resonate in our lives today.

Left: Jeff Koons, Ushering in Banality, 1988. © Jeff Koons, 2007 Right: Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Barricade, 2014, oil paint and ink on canvas Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Left: Jeff Koons, Ushering in Banality, 1988. © Jeff Koons, 2007 Right: Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Barricade, 2014, oil paint and ink on canvas Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

BRUCE NAUMAN

until October 24, 2021

A large-scale survey of the American artist Bruce Nauman (1941). For over five decades, Nauman has challenged the possibilities of what art can be. His use of a variety of media and unbridled urge for experimentation have made him one of the key figures of today’s art. Nauman’s interest in ambiguity and different layers of meaning relates to the daily human experience. The exhibition shows how, throughout his career, Nauman has been preoccupied by themes such as the body, language, control, and the artist’s studio. Nauman’s work is disruptive, confrontational, absurd and playful, and is often a mental as well as a physical experience.

Bruce Nauman, Studies for Holograms (a), 1970. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. © 2021 Bruce Nauman / Pictoright Amsterdam, Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York
Bruce Nauman, Studies for Holograms (a), 1970. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. © 2021 Bruce Nauman / Pictoright Amsterdam, Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York

CHARLOTTE PRODGER – SAF05

until September 5, 2021

The recent video installation SaF05 by Turner Prize winner Charlotte Prodger (Bournemouth, 1974) one of today’s most innovative time-based media artists, is named after a rare maned lioness that figures in the work as a cipher for queer attachment and desire. Prodger’s autobiographical voiceover traces a chronology of intimate gestures and interpersonal connections, from pubescence to the present. SaF05 is a meditation on relationships, however intangible, that expand and diffuse conceptions of intimacy, sexuality and kinship.

Charlotte Prodger, SaF05, 2019. Courtesy the artist, Hollybush Gardens, London, and Kendall Koppe, Glasgow
Charlotte Prodger, SaF05, 2019. Courtesy the artist, Hollybush Gardens, London, and Kendall Koppe, Glasgow

FROM THONET TO DUTCH DESIGN: 125 YEARS OF LIVING IN THE STEDELIJK

until 12 September 2021

An exhibition of the Stedelijk’s celebrated design collection. Experience some of the most innovative, iconic designs of the last 125 years. Explore the story of design, from a Thonet sofa – one of the oldest pieces in the collection – to designs by the Wiener Werkstätte, the Amsterdam School, and Scandinavian design, to the rise of plastic in the 1960s, the colourful Italian Memphis design of the 1980s, and Dutch design. The exhibition also touches on current challenges, such as sustainability and the impact of the corona crisis on design in the Netherlands.

Gallery ‘Sottsass and Postmodernism’, with work by Ettore Sottsass, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; wallpaper Bas van Beek, animations Bas van Beek and V2_Lab for the Unstable Media based on Memphis designs by Nathalie du Pasquier
Gallery ‘Sottsass and Postmodernism’, with work by Ettore Sottsass, collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; wallpaper Bas van Beek, animations Bas van Beek and V2_Lab for the Unstable Media based on Memphis designs by Nathalie du Pasquier

WE’RE OUT HERE
POST/NO/BILLS #1

until 19 September 2021

With POST/NO/BILLS, the Stedelijk highlights the newest trends, developments and themes in the world of graphic design. In this first edition, Metro54 presents We’re Out Here: an ode to street guerrilla poster culture. With work by designers Lydienne Albertoe, Serana Angelista, Jeanine van Berkel and Cengiz Mengüç. In this homage, Metro54 examines the visual language of the counterculture by asking: ‘Who owns the street? Who is permitted to use public space in times of need and privatization?’

Right: poster designed by Lydienne Albertoe, left: poster designed by Jeanine van Berkel
Right: poster designed by Lydienne Albertoe, left: poster designed by Jeanine van Berkel

NOTE FOR EDITORS:

For more information and visual material please contact the Stedelijk Museum Press Office: pressoffice@stedelijkmuseum.nl